Marine Markets

LNG fueled ships can operate in all regions without the need for marine fuel switching or expensive exhaust scrubbers.

LNG is considered to be the best fuel option to meet the International Maritime Organization’s 0.5% global Sulphur cap for marine fuels, which comes into effect in 2020. This reduction from the current standard of 3.5% Sulphur is in addition to other Sulphur caps on marine fuels within existing Environmental Control Area’s (ECA’s) in various regions, particularly within the coastal regions of the continental United States and Canada.

LNG meets all of these requirements as it contains virtually no Sulphur (typically about 0.004% on a mass-to-mass basis). This allows for a LNG fueled ship to operate in all regions without the need for fuel switching or expensive exhaust scrubbers.

Additionally LNG has other distinct benefits over traditional oil-based marine fuels such as:

  • Lower NOx, SOx, PM and GHG over HFO without the need for complicated exhaust clean up systems
  • Less environmental risk in the case of a fuel spill
  • Ability to transition to renewable natural gas as supply becomes available

The IMO strategy for the reduction of GHG emissions from ships, issued in 2018, lays out the plan to reduce the total emissions from global shipping by 40% by 2030 and 70% by 2050, compared to 2008 levels. Fueling ocean going vessels with LNG can greatly contribute to this goal.

North America has as abundant supply of natural gas and with a dedicated marine fuel terminal, Puget LNG provides marine customers with fuel price stability and a dedicated supply chain. The facility is designed specifically to meet maritime fueling requirements with shore side direct loading access. This allows Puget LNG in the future to provide ship-to-ship and truck-to-ship LNG transfer.

Key Customer

TOTE Maritime is an industry leader in environmental responsibility through many environmental initiatives including plans to convert their vessels to liquefied natural gas power (LNG).

TOTE is converting the engines of the two Orca-class container ships that travel from Tacoma to Alaska to duel fuel. These vessels will also surpass the standards put in place by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s clean air regulations.